World Congress on Risk 2015
19-23 July, 2015, Singapore

Online Program



Session Schedule & Abstracts


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Common abbreviations

Monday 20-07-2015

M4-F
Towards Regional Standards in Disaster Statistics for Effective Risk Communication

Room: Auditorium   14:00–15:30

Chair(s): Puji Pujiono



0    “Towards Regional Standards in Disaster Statistics for Effective Risk Communication”. KIM Hae Ryun, Statistical REsearch Institute, Korea; ONO Yuichi, International Research Institute of Disaster Science (IRIDeS), Tohoku University, Japan; WIBOWO Agus, National Disaster Managment Agency, Indonesia; SHARMA Rajesh, United Nations Development Programme (UNDP); PUJIONO Puji, United Nations Economic and Social Commissions for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP)   pujiono@un.org (104)

Abstract: 1. Background: Natural disasters are adversely affecting development in Asia Pacific region. As progress and results in disaster risks management are increasingly tied up with the post-2015 sustainable development, there is the need for common indicators to measure them and to communicate risks to stakeholders. Countries in Asia Pacific mandated UNESCAP to form an expert group comprising statisticians and disaster risk reduction authorities and experts to develop a regionally agreed basic range of disaster-related statistics. 2. Problem statement: Studies show that even basic statistics on disasters are not adequately and consistently collected and reported. This seriously impedes planners and policy-makers to develop effective disaster and climate policies and programmes. The absence of regional standards also hampers regional level analysis for regional policy making and strategy development. Without an effective risk communication governments are unable to determine with certainty the extent to which disaster adversely influence development. The absence of standardized disaster statistics also hinder the ability of government in monitoring and reporting progress that they make in attaining the numerical targets in the post-2015 framework for disaster risk reduction and the sustainable development goals. 3. Evidence from the field: A five-country field study revealed that countries gather large number of information on disaster occurrences and their impacts for various different purposes. There are no commonalities, however, on the nature of the data and how the data is being used. There are also gaps in definitions, classifications and valuations to the extent that the data suffer from inconsistency and have no interoperability. 4. Purpose: To improve risk monitoring, reporting and communication through an establishment of a basic range of disaster – related statistics through development of regional standards to help governments develop robust basis for risk analysis and to facilitate risk communication. 5. Deliverables: An improved draft basic range of disaster related-statistics to be presented for policy deliberation 6. Proposed agenda: Opening: Ms. Lisa Bersales, National Statistician, Philippines Presentation: Ms. KIM, Hae Ryun (Korea) Presentation of findings of disaster statistics practices in Asia Pacific Countries Countries use a wide variety of methods and tools to organize their disaster – related data. Generally there is formal agreement on the range of disaster-related statistics to be collected and lack common protocol that governs the data collection, analysis and dissemination to feed policy making and development planning. Occurrence and impacts of disasters are not systemically recorded and reported in the national statistics system to be an integral part of development considerations to feed into policy making, development planning and decisions for sustainable development as well as to monitor progress in the implementation of development plans. There is a need to establish internationally agreed standards and guidelines to improve comparability of disaster statistics between countries. It will involve a set of authoritative reference to help determine the basic definitions, classifications, and measurements of disaster – related statistics. Discussion a. Mr. ONO, Yuichi (Japan): The relevance of disaster related statistics to the goals and targets of the post-2015 framework for disaster risk reduction Disaster risk reduction is crucial for achieving the post-2015 sustainable development goal’s objective. In that context the 3rd UN World Conference on Disaster Risk reduction, held in Sendai in March 2015, will adopt specific expected outcome and numerical targets that need to be operationalized into a set of indicators for monitoring and reporting. Countries will need to develop their own additional national level indicators which require disaster related statistics to measure the reality in consistent and systematic manner. The current gaps suggest pressing need to develop countries’ capacity to establish such a basic range of disaster statistics to help countries monitor and report progress they make in achieving the targets. b. Mr. SHARMA, Rajesh (UNDP), regional standards on disaster statistics to enhance disaster risk analysis at country level policy and programming: linking with development targets and indicators National level disaster statistics which are driven by specific national legislations and policy strategies vary greatly one from the others. Regional standards are needed to ensure the availability of comparable data of good quality to help effective comparisons between countries and regions. At national level the standard provides a common statistical ‘language’ to help feed disaster information meaningfully to the development planning processes. Countries, particularly the LDC and LLDCs, would benefit from regional standards to design and implement a basic range of disaster related statistics to include all parts of the data production, the analysis and use of data to capture the progress being made against the national and international sets of indicators within the overall vision of the sustainable development in which disaster risk reduction is part of. c. Mr. WIBOWO, Agus (Indonesia), Applicability of a basic range of disaster related statistics: developing country perspectives The evolution of the nationally owned -Indonesian Disaster Data and Information Database (DIBI) in Indonesia – can provide the insights into the utility of the information management tool and the establishment of a comprehensive disaster statistics. Following the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami, Indonesia established the Indonesian Disaster Information and Data (DIBI) largely by adapting UNDP’s Desinventar system, which basic range covers the disaster historical damage and losses. The programme has transformed the previously fragmented and incoherent disaster data production into a national disaster information system covering history of disaster occurrence and economic loses from as early as 1815. The basic range of disaster range of statistics now integrates the mainstream socioeconomic statistics to establish the relationship between disaster risk and poverty reduction. The statistics has been used for risk identification, policy formulation and decision making, and more lately for determining the allocation of development resources local governments and sectoral programmes. Summary and way forward: Mr. PUJIONO, Puji (ESCAP) a basic range of disaster related statistics: takeaway recommendations towards establishing regional standards

1    Disaster statistics practices in Asia Pacific Countries. KIM Hae Ryun    (320)

Abstract: Study undertaken by UNESCAP and UNDP, in preparation of the work of an Expert Group on Disaster-related Statistics, revealed that countries use a wide variety of methods and tools to organize their disaster – related data. Typically a formal agreement is not in place to determine the range of disaster-related statistics which is needed to guide what information to be collected. There is also lack of a common protocol that governs the coordination among the disaster risk management technical authority and the statistical authorities who are supposed to provide technical advisory services on data management and to present the data in a meaningful manner to feed policy making and development planning. Countries show different level of investment in data collection and in the capability for analysis to and integration of the information into development planning. Consequently data utilisation for sustainable development planning, monitoring, reporting is, at best, haphazard. There is a need to establish internationally agreed standards and guidelines to improve comparability of disaster statistics between countries. It will involve a set of authoritative reference to help determine the basic definitions, classifications, and measurements of disaster – related statistics. Development of such a standard will need to take into account the countries' current practices in managing disaster data and statistics as guided by their particular legal and formal frameworks. Given the breadth of domain of disaster-related statistics it is important to confine the work in measuring disaster occurrence and their immediate direct impacts as the basic range of disaster related statistics while continue accumulating knowledge and good practices pertaining to the other aspects of the overall disaster risk management.

2    The relevance of disaster related statistics to the goals and targets of the post-2015 framework for disaster risk reduction . ONO Yuichi    (321)

Abstract: Reducing the impact of disasters is one of crucial prerequisites for the sustainable development goal's objective of eradicating poverty and achieving the desired level of economic growth that will build shared prosperity and ensuring the achievement of all other post-2015 goals. In this regard post-2015 framework for disaster risk reduction is key to ensure that economic, social and environmental assets and investments are protected from the adverse impacts of disasters. In the 3rd UN World Conference on Disaster Risk reduction, held in Sendai in March 2015, the international community adopted specific expected outcome and the appropriate numerical targets to strengthen global efforts to increase political support for disaster risk reduction, global visibility, and accountability for integrating risk management in the fold of sustainable development. These targets need to be operationalized into a set of indicators which is key in order to ensure that in reality this target delivers the actual desired changes on the ground. Countries will need to develop their own additional indicators at national level to complement and contextualise the indicators. These indicators will necessarily be based primarily on quantitative data sets which measure the ground reality against those indicators. At a minimum, there is a requirement for consistent and systematic statistics to monitor and report sufficiently the impacts of disasters, ideally disaggregated at sub-national level, and progress being made to reduce them overtime. Whereas the current debate has been primarily focusing on the databases, it is a pressing need to develop countries' capacity to establish a basic range of disaster statistics which serve as foundation for measuring the indicators.

3    Regional disaster statistical standards to enhance disaster risk analysis at country level policy and programming. SHARMA Rajesh    (322)

Abstract: National level disaster statistics is driven by the national legislations and strategies, their needs for policy formulation, analysis and implementation, monitoring and evaluation of disaster-related programmes. As such the range of statistical services at national level varies greatly one from the others. Regional standards on disaster statistics are put in place to ensure the availability of comparable data of good quality on member States in order to help effective comparisons between countries and regions. At national level the standard should help countries define, implement, and analyse disaster-related development policies and programmes by providing a common statistical ‘language' that embraces concepts, methods, structures and technical standards. In addition, it provides the needed reference to strengthen statistical infrastructure including harmonisation of definitions and classifications that constitute a basic range of disaster related statistics. Based on these standards countries could collect, verify, and analyse national data in such manner using harmonized methodology to ensure that they could meaningfully feed the development planning processes and, to the extent possible, comparable at regional level. The ability of regional standards to help country level risk analysis depends, in part on the compatibility of the regional standards and national objectives to deal effectively with the complex coordination challenges in the compilation, analysis, and dissemination of disaster statistics. Effective disaster risk analysis at country level policy and programming requires the integration in and consistency of the disaster statistics with the general development strategies of the country. Countries, particularly the LDC and LLDCs, would benefit from supports to design and implement a basic range of disaster related statistics to include all parts of the data production units and address the issues related to the analysis and use of data which and build on all past and existing activities and experiences. Ultimately countries need to have nationally owned and produced data that capture the progress being made against the national and international sets of indicators within the overall vision of the sustainable development in which disaster risk reduction is part of.

4    Applicability of a basic range of disaster related statistics: developing country perspectives. WIBOWO Agus    (323)

Abstract: Lessons learned through the evolution of the nationally owned -Indonesian Disaster Data and Information Database (DIBI) – can provide the insights into the utility of the information management tool and the establishment of a comprehensive disaster statistics. The devastation of the December 26 2004 Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami triggered the pressing need for an effective statistical system for recording, monitoring and analyzing the trends evident in the occurrence, magnitude, and the impact of disasters. Previously, disaster data was collected by quite a number of government agencies without any coherence framework. Complicating matters further, the devolution of administrative responsibilities to the districts and provinces meant that responsibility for disaster data management was in further disarray. In 2007, as a new disaster management law was promulgated, National Agency for Disaster Management (BNPB) and the National Development Planning Agency jointly established the Indonesian Disaster Information and Data (DIBI) largely by adapting UNDP's Desinventar system, which basic range covers the disaster historical damage and losses. Statistics are collected from local governments which are validated by national government. It provides national level disaster information on disaster occurrence covering the period as early as 1815 to present time, to include natural as well technological disasters and both human and economic losses. The basic range of disaster range of statistics has now been expanded through the integration with the mainstream socioeconomic statistics to highlight the relationship between disaster risk and poverty reduction. This is a world-first on a country-wide basis that allows drilling-down into sub-district level. At present, the disaster statistics has helped to focus the attention of all stakeholders towards disaster risk initiatives in a coherent manner. BNPB, ministries, sub-national administrations and other disaster risk management stakeholders have been using the DIBI for risk identification, policy formulation and decision making, and more lately for ensuring that development resources allocation to risk reduction programmes are based on the evidence-based trends and patterns identified through DIBI-based analysis. The disaster statistics enhances the capacity for all phases of disaster management planning at national and sub-national level; improves disaster reporting and monitoring of the implementation of the internationally agreed disaster management-related commitments. Among the outstanding challenges to the Indonesian disaster statistics is in improving the quality of data in terms of accuracy and consistency especially the data extracted directly from sectoral agencies. A concerted “data cleaning” is required. At the technical and technological fronts, there is the need to strengthen the capacity of sub-national authorities to implement the DIBI information management system in an integrated manner with the statistical offices.



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