Preliminary Schedule of Presentations

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The program of events is subject to change. Check this site for updates. When you arrive on site at the meeting, check the final schedule for any last-minute changes.

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SUNDAY, July 4, 2010
Salon 12 Salon 11 Salon 10 Salon 9 Salon 2 Salon 3 Salon 4 Salon 8
8:00am - 10:00am SY 42: Sustainable use in wildlife conservation (E. Merrill) 1-Contributed Papers: Invasive Species (mod. F. Courchamp) SY 63: Bridging the science-policy gap: critical habitat under ESA and SARA (F. Schmiegelow) SY 32: Developing adaptability: the promise and pitfalls of collaborative conservation (B. Lauber) 2-Contributed Papers: Amphibian Declines (mod. Cindy Paszkowski) 3-Contributed Papers: Ecosystem Services (mod. E. Mapfumo) SY 15: Paying for conservation in a changing world (J. Igoe) Speed Presentations: Landscape Ecology (mod. F. Huettman)
Break
10:30am - 12:30pm SY 42: Sustainable use in wildlife conservation (E. Merrill) SY 12: Using conservation science to influence public policy: lessons from North America (D. DellaSalla) SY 63: Bridging the science-policy gap: critical habitat under ESA and SARA (F. Schmiegelow) SY 36: Tracking progress towards the 2010 Biodiversity Target and Beyond (V. Kapos) SY 61: Protected areas and climate change: mitigation and adaption in Canada's protected areas. (M. Pellatt) SY 41: Artificial lights and nature: challenges for dusk-to-dawn conservation management (T. Longcore) SY 15: Paying for conservation in a changing world (J. Igoe) Speed Presentations: Species Trends & Status (mod. J. Jacobs)
Lunch: 12:30pm - 2:00pm WS 75: Alberta land-use framework (M. Seiferling) WS 39: Integrating Religion in Conservation Biology(K. Sheikh) WS 82: How do we define recovery for species at risk? (S. Pinkus) Science-Publications Committee meeting WS 22: Climate Adaptation Knowledge Exchange (L. Hansen) WS 34: Training Conservation Leaders (R. Dalzen) Social Science Working Group meeting WS 8: Participating in a conference (M. Hunter)
2:00pm - 4:00pm SY 31: Caribou conservation: international perspectives on management and policy (L. Vors) SY 12: Using conservation science to influence public policy: lessons from North America (D. DellaSalla) SY 53: Effective critical habitat policy (K. Prior) 4-Contributed Papers: Avian Conservation (mod. Erin Bayne) 5-Contributed Papers: Community-based Conservation (mod. M. Rudd) SY 41: Artificial lights and nature: challenges for dusk-to-dawn conservation management (T. Longcore) SY 45: The extinction crisis: synthesis and new directions for predicting risk across vertebrates (A. Davidson) Speed Presentations: Aquatic Systems (mod. O. Johnson)
Break
4:30pm - 5:30pm Plenary speaker: Shane Mahoney
Fiddling While Rome Burns: Conservation's Divisions Thwart Conservation Success
The conservation movement enters the 21st century facing a staggering array of formidable challenges. Whether viewed from local, national or international perspectives the expanding fronts of human population growth, habitat loss and degradation, climate change and biodiversity depletion are now positioned to overwhelm the movement's achievements and its historic infrastructures. There can be no doubt that a new and more effective conservation framework has to be developed if the natural world and its life support systems are to be recovered, stabilized and maintained. From shattered oceanic systems to the escalating loss of pollinators, and on to the depletion of large carnivores and are closest primate relatives, the scale of environmental impact and species assemblage destabilization represent problems of a scale we are ill prepared to address. Their increasing severity is also some measure of our own movement's progress. While focusing on these specific problems is rightly a preoccupation of our movement, it is clear that piecemeal solutions are no cure for the malaise in our midst. A new global strategy is required that aligns and synergizes the existing strengths of the conservation community, a seemingly self evident truth; a goal that surely must lie within our grasp. However, history wages a different bet, for the conservation movement has since its earliest days been fractured, and most fundamentally along the lines of whether humanity will utilize wildlife or strive to preserve it within systems devoid of human take. Along this fault line runs a spectrum of energies that flow outwards towards highly polarized positions, each of which struggles for position, capacity and effect. From those who hunt wildlife to those committed to animal rights, there seems little doubt that many roads can lead to a conservation commitment. The question is: which road will lead to conservation success? Like the founders of the conservation movement in the late nineteenth century, we must bring unity of purpose to the forefront of our scramble for effect, not promulgation of ideological position. John Muir and Theodore Roosevelt represented positions that were in some ways far apart, but this did not stop their cooperative efforts in the heady days of conservation's birth. Each longed for and fought to sustain the natural world. The gradual conceptual drift that has led us to our philosophical chasm today, the so called preservationist-utilitarian dichotomy, must be replaced by the one process that has, throughout human history, led to progress. That process is dialogue and attendance to the greater good. Together conservationists of all persuasions can render greater service to the natural world and the human component of it. To do so does not require abandonment of principles, but a more profound commitment to the principal matter at hand. There is, in fact, great strength in our differences. Thus we need not fiddle while Rome burns; nor blame the ideological others when it does.
5:30pm - 6:00pm Announcements
6:00-7:30 Poster Session - Location: Hall A
(Posters in the Sun/Mon session will be available for viewing until Monday late afternoon
7:30pm Canadian Subsection Launch



MONDAY, July 5, 2010
Salon 12 Salon 11 Salon 4 Salon 3 Salon 10 Salon 2 Salon 9 Salon 8
8:00am - 10:00am SY 28: Conserving large mammal predator-prey systems in a changing world (N. Webb) SY 72: What's the big idea? - a conversation on North American continental conservation (G. Tabor) SY 7: Economic growth and biodiversity conservation: from theory to the policy arena (B. Czech) 6-Contributed Papers: Grasslands and Savannas (mod. C. Gates) SY 68: Boreal forest of opportunity: where science, policy, and indigenous rights intersect (D. Roberts) SY 76: Arthropod conservation in managed landscapes (J. Spence) 7-Contributed Papers: Species at Risk (mod. R. Quinlan) Speed Presentations: Climate Change (mod. A. Thornhill)
Break
10:30am - 12:30pm SY 28: Conserving large mammal predator-prey systems in a changing world (N. Webb) SY 72: What's the big idea? - a conversation on North American continental conservation (G. Tabor) SY 10: Adding it up: a practical review of payments for environmental services (PES) projects (N. Gross-Camp) SY 65: Freshwater and marine conservation (H. Patricio) 8-Contributed Papers: Aboriginal Traditional Knowledge (mod. L. Innes) SY 76: Arthropod conservation in managed landscapes (J. Spence) Student Awards Finalists Presentations (Session 1; mod. D. Patrick) Speed Presentations: Biodiversity (mod. J. Ray)
Lunch: 12:30pm - 2:00pm WS 11: What do conservation managers read? (A. Pullin) Environmental Bill of Rights for Canadians (L. Duncan) WS 80: Addressing biodiversity and ecological integrity through strategic land-use simulation modeling (B. Stelfox) Chapters Business Meeting Africa Section Meeting Asia Section Meeting Austral & Neotropical America Section meeting Europe Section meeting
2:00pm - 4:00pm 9-Contributed papers: Large Carnivores (mod. J. Packard) SY 35: Large-scale wildlife conservation in western North America: ecological restoration of bison (K. Redford) 10-Contributed Papers: Plant Conservation (mod. Ellen Macdonald) 24-Contributed Papers: Conservation for a Changing Planet (mod. Stan Boutin) SY 4: Top priorities of Canadian and American policymakers for conservation science (E. Fleishman) 11-Contributed Papers: Disease and Parasites (mod. Margo Pybus) Student Awards Finalists Presentations (Session 2; mod. D. Patrick) Speed Presentations: Birds (mod. S. Song)
Break
4:30pm - 5:30pm Plenary speaker: Dr. Tyrone Hayes
From Silent Spring to Silent Night: A Tale of Toads and Men
The herbicide, atrazine, is a potent endocrine disruptor. My laboratory's studies in amphibians have shown that atrazine both demasculinizes and feminizes exposed males at levels as low as 0.1 ppb. Our previous worked examined morphological effects, including the loss of androgen-dependent sexually dimorphic features, and the development of estrogen-dependent features in exposed males. These findings are consistent with an induction of aromatase, resulting in decreased androgen secretion and inappropriate estrogen synthesis and secretion. Our ongoing studies focus on behavioral effects in male frogs exposed throughout life and demonstrate both the loss of male reproductive behavior and the induction of female-typical behavior in exposed males. These data on amphibians and the proposed mechanism are consistent with findings across vertebrate classes, including humans, and raise concern about the role of this common environmental contaminant in reproductive hormone-dependent cancers in and declining fertility in humans.
5:30pm - 6:00pm Announcements
6:00pm - 6:30pm
6:30pm - 8:00pm Student Networking Reception (University of Alberta)
8:00pm - 10:00pm Premiere of National Geographic's "Great Migrations" (University of Alberta)



TUESDAY, July 6, 2010
Salon 11 Salon 12 Salon 10 Salon 9 Salon 2 Salon 3 Salon 4 Salon 8
8:00am - 10:00am SY 33: Salmonids running amok (O. Johnson) SY 71: Conserving grizzly bear populations at risk in North America (J. Pissot) SY 73: Conserving Canada's ecosystems: threats and prospects (A.Moores) SY 13: Priorities for the conservation of the world's mammalian fauna (C. Rondinini) SY 19: Sustainable conservation: investing in nature or investing in people? (R. Goldman) 12-Contributed Papers: Population Modelling (mod. Mark Burgman) SY 77: Nature conservation in human dominated landscapes (Martin Dieterich) Speed Presentations: Invasive Species (mod. R. Primack)
Break
10:30am - 12:30pm SY 52: Climate change adaptation in North America: marine & coastal environments (R. Gregg) SY 71: Conserving grizzly bear populations at risk in North America (M. Proctor) SY 73: Conserving Canada's ecosystems: threats and prospects (A. Moores) SY 13: Strategic priorities for the conservation of the world's mammalian fauna (C. Rondinini) 13-Contributed Papers: Harvesting (mod. Corey Bradshaw) SY 24: Incorporating and modelling patch dynamics in conservation planning (N. Ban) 14-Contributed papers: Human-dominated landscapes (mod. M. Dieterich) Speed Presentations: Community-based Conservation (mod. Michelle Bacon)
Lunch: 12:30pm - 2:00pm Teaching Adaptive Management Meeting WS 5: The publication process for SCB's journals (Fleishman) WS 50: IPBES--Ensuring That Multilateral Environmental Agreements Have High Quality (J. Fitzgerald) Joint North America Section-Canada Subsection Meeting Marine Section Meeting Oceania Section Meeting Ecological Economics and Sustainability Working Group Meeting TBA
2:00pm - 4:00pm Members Meeting
Break
4:30pm - 5:30pm LaRoe Awardees & Smith Fellows
Tackling the Future's Most Pressing Conservation Challenges in a Changing World
Global ecological and social change is unprecedented in its magnitude and rate. Are we currently poised to handle these challenges? The quickening pace of global change is forcing conservation biologists to look ahead, think strategically and prioritize their conservation research and actions within the context of an uncertain future. In this plenary session, LaRoe Award Recipients and David H. Smith Fellows will discuss their views on the major conservation challenges likely to face conservation science in the next century. Panelists will debate how our thinking, institutions, research and avenues for implementation need to change in order to tackle the growing list of conservation goals confronting society. Panelists will pinpoint the skills conservation biologists need to be effective leaders and ways of sharpen these skills. The goal of this plenary is to offer forward-thinking approaches to effect conservation change on the ground and highlight research priorities in light of our changing word. We hope the audience will join this dialogue and will leave with some new insights on how to best propel conservation research forward to tackle the foremost issues of the future and increase the impact of every conservation scientist and practitioner.

[Plenary panel with LaRoe Awardees and Smith Fellows: Moderator: Jedediah Brodie, Ecologist-at-Large, Wildlife Biology Program, University of Montana. La Roe Awardee Panelists: David Schindler, Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta; Edwin P. (Phil) Pister, Executive Secretary, Desert Fishes Council; J. Michael Scott, Professor, Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, University of Idaho; Research Scientist, USGS. Smith Fellows Panelists: Myra Finkelstein, Assistant Researcher, University of California Santa Cruz; Jim Manolis, Forest Landscape Ecologist, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; Cara Nelson, Assistant Professor of Restoration Ecology, University of Montana]
5:30pm - 6:00pm Announcements
6:00pm-7:30pm Poster Session - Location: Hall A
(Posters in the Tue/Wed session will be available for viewing until Wednesday late afternoon
7:30pm Conservation Science-Policy Round Table Meeting (7-8pm)



WEDNESDAY, July 7, 2010
Salon 12 Salon 11 Salon 10 Salon 2 Salon 3 Salon 9 Salon 4 Salon 8
8:00am - 10:00am 15-Contributed papers: Climate change & conservation (mod. D. Armstrong) SY 14: Biodiversity monitoring: what Is required for success? (J. Schieck) SY 9: Coupling land-use and conservation planning to create sustainable communities and protect biodiversity (A. Merenlender) 16-Contributed Papers: Trophic-level Dynamics (mod. M. Musciani) SY 25: Novel approaches to understanding illegal behaviour in conservation (A. Keane) SY 26: Effective conservation in a changing planet (M. Somers) 17-Contributed Papers: Conservation Genetics (mod. David Coltman) Speed Presentations: Mammals (mod. W. Lidicker)
Break
10:30am - 12:30pm SY 60: The three C's - conservation & carbon in the context of global change (J. Gamon) SY 14: Biodiversity monitoring: what Is required for success? (J. Schieck) 18-Contributed papers: Policy topics & CBD (mod. S. Woodley) 19-Contributed Papers: Marine Conservation (mod. Peter Aku) SY 23: Conservation planning for off reserve actions: expanding the conservation planning toolbox (V. Adams) SY 26: Effective conservation in a changing planet (M. Somers) 20-Contributed Papers: Spatial Ecology (mod. H. Locke) Speed Presentations: Conservation Genetics (mod. C. Strobeck)
Lunch: 12:30pm - 2:00pm WS 78: An Introduction to Alberta oil sands (J. Doucet) Voices of Nature (H. Arntzen) WS 44: Convention on Biological Diversity (J. Fitzgerald) Freshwater Working Group FWS Listening Session 23-Caribou (mod. H. U. Wittmer) Science and Religion and Conservation Biology Working Groups Meeting TBA Editorial Board meeting (conference room)
2:00pm - 4:00pm SY 79: Challenges and emerging solutions to development of Alberta's oil sands (B. Purdy) 21-Contributed Papers: Northern Ecosystems (mod. D. Hik) SY 43: Supporting conservation through the convention on biological diversity (J. Fitzgerald) SY 67: Conservation design for human beings: agency, identity, and successful institutions (G. Myers) 22-Contributed Papers: Economics (mod. V. Adamowicz) SY 57: Using nature to protect people from climate change impacts (J. Molnar) SY 51: Ecological Connectivity (M. Cross/C. Chester) Speed Presentations: Large Carnivores (mod. J. Northrup)
Break
4:30pm - 5:30pm Plenary speaker: Dr. David Schindler
Comprehensive Conservation Planning to Protect Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in Canadian Boreal Regions under a Changing Climate and Increasing Exploitation
Boreal regions contain more than half of the carbon in forested regions of the world and over 60 % of the world's surface freshwater. Carbon storage and the flood control and water filtration provided by freshwaters and wetlands have recently been identified as the most important ecosystem services provided by boreal regions, but ecosystem services and sensitive ways of detecting their impairment have so far not been fully included in boreal conservation planning. Climate warming, via its effect on permafrost melting, insect damage, and forest fire, threatens to trigger large positive carbon feedbacks that may enhance the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. In a water-scarce world, there is increasing pressure to divert and exploit boreal freshwaters, and devising conservation plans to protect boreal freshwaters and their catchments is urgent. I propose a catchment-based approach that includes water and chemical mass-balances as a sensitive means of detecting early degradation of many ecosystem services in both catchments and freshwaters, and give some examples of where this has been advantageous in the past. The necessary modifications to current conservation planning are simple ones, and the advantages are great.
5:30pm - 6:00pm Announcements
6:00pm Fort Edmonton Park BBQ (end of conference picnic)